Getting Your Ideas Heard
Lying for Employees / May 13, 2019

Getting Your Ideas Heard We’ve been discussing dealing with the theft of your idea by a co-worker. The discouraging truth seems to be that it’s very hard to win this battle. So, instead you need to win the war and get your ideas heard. A much more positive way to approach this is to become the go-to idea guy. That is, the person the boss expects to come up with original ideas. First, of course, you have to have the innovative ideas to pitch. That I can’t help you with. If you do not typically come up with new takes, then I’d make my mark in some other way. Otherwise, you’ll end up like Emmett. But having the idea is not enough. You’ve got to get the powers-that-be excited about it. Getting new ideas adopted Again, if you generally work with a good group, you can create that excitement by having lots of colleagues sharing your enthusiasm. This is by far the preferable way to interest your boss. However, if you are in a group with one or more confirmed idea-stealers, you might want to answer the following questions as a way to pitch your idea to your boss. Is…

Protecting Yourself against Idea Stealers
Lying for Employees / May 6, 2019

Protecting Yourself against Idea Stealers You assumed, incorrectly in this case, that Emmett was a good colleague who would help you hone and develop your idea. Frankly, I think that’s a good assumption to make generally (more of this later), but equally, you need to be aware if you are working with idea stealers. What can you do to protect yourself against idea stealers? You have already twigged to one strategy—don’t discuss ideas with people like that. But Emmett may ask for your suggestions for an idea he ostensibly has come up with. Do not give him any as he likely has an empty bucket he’s hoping you’ll fill. Instead, say something like, “Gosh, Emmett, I’m blanking. But if I think of anything, I’ll let you know.” Then put it out of your mind and continue with your life. Don’t even do it if he offers to share the credit with you. He won’t and you’ll be back in the same old position. If you come up with an idea, and for some reason, must discuss it with Emmett (e.g. because he has some special expertise), do it in the presence of someone else. You might float it during a…

Doing Nothing when Someone Rips Offs Your Idea
Lying for Employees / April 29, 2019

Doing Nothing when Someone Rips Offs Your Idea Emmett, a co-worker, rips off your idea. He denies it and your mutual boss, Len, doesn’t believe you when you complain. What’s left? Does that mean you should let Emmett get away scott-free? No way. Yes, possibly. The advantages of doing nothing I know, the idea sticks in your craw. But consider the following: It’s your word against Emmett’s. Emmett has more credibility with Len than you do, however undeserved. You risk looking like a whiner to Len. Anything you do is unlikely to make a difference. I can hear the grinding of teeth. This is so unfair. And it is. It seems as if people like Emmett can get profile dishonestly and there seems to be no way to stop him. Actually, in the long run, the Emmetts of the world often get their come-uppance. For one thing, as has already happened in your work group, everyone except you is wise to Emmett and it’s unlikely they’ll float ideas in front of him. So, he has to rely on newbies like you. But you also are once burned, twice shy. Eventually, Emmett is cut off from new ideas to steal. And…