Defending Against Credit Stealers
Power for Employees / October 25, 2021

Defending Against Credit Stealers In the last post, you found out that you and your collaborator, Wes, had completely different interpretations of whether he had hogged the limelight. You were eventually able to work out things out. But what if you have suspected all along that Wesley, hail-fellow-well-met that he is, ranks among the best of the credit stealers? How to know recognition stealers It’s not always easy, especially since Wesley has been helpful with your project and added value. But some things you can look for: Does he use ‘I’ a lot? I did it rather than we did it. This can be an indication of his penchant. Is he the first off the mark? That is, he consistently grabs the first word even in just regular get-togethers. Does he go on and on? He never takes a breath so someone else can break in. All of these are annoying but can just be the signs of a vigorous extrovert. The real kicker is: Do you trust him? If you already find yourself picking your words carefully when with him or avoiding sharing ideas, you might have something to worry about. Setting up differently Knowing that you are both…

Confronting a Suggestion Stealer
Power for Employees / October 18, 2021

Confronting a Suggestion Stealer In the last post, you developed a game for pre-kindergarten. Wesley, who is senior to you but not your boss, had been very helpful in brainstorming solutions to problems. But when both of you were asked to present the suggestion to management, Wesley took all the airtime, making you look like a hanger-on. After the meeting, you are steaming at the dirty trick. You’re gonna get him on it. The letting-off-steam approach You: Why did you do it? Wesley: Hey, Nick, they liked the idea! You: Yeah, with you hogging all the credit. Wesley: What? I was showing the product in the best light. You: And where do you get off giving it a name? Wesley: It just came to me. But good, no? You: That’s not the point. I couldn’t get a word in edgewise. Wesley: What are you talking about? I saved your ass when you clammed up. You: I didn’t—you didn’t let me have any air time. Wesley: Let you? I wasn’t stopping you—I was covering for you. You: And took all the credit. Wesley: Oh, grow up, Nick. I’m not your babysitter—if you want air time, you gotta take it. You: So…

My Colleague is Grabbing the Glory for My Work
Power for Employees / October 13, 2021

My Colleague is Grabbing the Glory for My Work Note: some got an error message on this post so here it is again. You are looking forward to getting some glory for a new, and even innovative, product you’re developed for your employer, a very large children’s toy manufacturer. It fills a niche for pre-kindergarten in your company’s line. The game doesn’t require as much manual dexterity as those for older children but is more challenging mentally then the regular pre-kindergarten stuff. This could be a great selling feature. You’ve put a lot of sweat equity into this and felt that there has been real team work with Wesley, a more senior designer. He is not your supervisor but he’s been a big help, throwing around ideas. You two are ready to present the prototype to your management. The presentation meeting Manager: So Wesley and Nick want to give us an update on the smart pre-kindergarten game. Who’s gonna start? You and Wesley look at each other. Before You can say anything: Wesley: Why don’t I? I’m really happy with the progress on what I’m thinking of calling the Baby Einstein game. This is news to you! Manager: Hey, I…

Benefiting from Being In the Posse
Power for Employees / February 1, 2021

 Benefiting from Being In the Posse So you’re in the posse, the chosen in-group. You’re invited to the TGIFs and the bull session isn’t complete without you. Congratulations. However, a seat at the table is not enough. If all you do is laugh at their jokes and nod vigorously, you’ll gradually but surely slip out of the in-group. To stay in, you need a presence. How? This post will discuss what you need and how you to fake it until you feel confident. Good interventions When first included, you may not know the topic or perspective needed. Do some homework. Zero in on where to make an effective intervention. Being for or against what the rest of the posse are for/against is not usually enough. Make substantive points. Fit them in as appropriate but don’t cram. Even one effective intervention will add credibility. Don’t talk off the top of your head. Prepare to impress. Make the point with the posse quickly Often in-groupers have good points but don’t say them effectively and quickly. They give the impression of thinking out loud. Don’t assume you can. You’re untested and the in-group posse won’t sit through your musings. Practice the effective and…

Is It Worth Being an Insider?
Power for Employees / January 25, 2021

Is It Worth Being an Insider? It’s a lot of work to manage your position in the group. And sometimes sacrifice. So do you even want to be an insider? The answer is usually yes Generally speaking, the in-crowd gang gets the most perks, the best assignments, the most forgiveness for screw-ups. There are more chances to strut your stuff and line up the next promotion. So, lots of good career reasons why it’s better to be in. But that isn’t always true. When you don’t want to be an insider Peer led in-groups Sometimes in-groups form which are not boss-led. They may be all the cool guys or at least those who think they are. They’re often more social than work-oriented. Join the group because it’s fun or exciting but not for your career. Groups opposed to the company goals This kind of gang does exist. Members don’t buy the company’s direction, don’t trust management, and believe they could run things better. All of which may be true, but they often enjoy scepticism more than rectifying. Eventually, you’ll tire of cynicism which goes nowhere. You don’t need to be Pollyanna, but neither is it helpful to be an insider…